General Discussion: Facebook/Lamebook.


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d_low
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805 posts since 20/8/10

22 Jul 2013 23:03
this new graph search is wank. Can;t find anything any more. I always 'like' obscure bands on there but can't find fuck all no more Evil
robii
robii avatar

18857 posts since 8/9/06

22 Jul 2013 23:07
what do people use instead of Facebook these days? Will go the same way as MySpace in no time
OliverGauffe
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16 posts since 8/7/13

23 Jul 2013 14:04
I was sure a couple of years ago that FB would go the way of MySpace due to the lack of sharing technology it provided at the time. But now it is possible to share photos, links, documents with others… the only thing missing is filesharing. I think the social network thing has become so engrained in modern society, that it is now past the point of going away. Whether or not FB is replaced by a newer/better/trendier network remains to be seen, but I don't think it will happen now for at least 5 years. And when it does happen, it won't be because FB sucks or because there is something technically better, but because another site will be "obscure" and cool at first, and then everyone will be on it. Good topic, there are probably books written about this…
robii
robii avatar

18857 posts since 8/9/06

23 Jul 2013 15:24
Yeah, Facebook is connected to everything now, but that's most annoying thing about it. Every 3rd or 4th post on my news feed is an advert or a high score on some game or so and so watched Harry Potter on Netflix. Who wants to read all that crap? I know you can change your settings so you don't see that stuff, but in my experience people are posting/talking way less and that's what Facebook is about. Everything else is superflous.
burny
burny avatar

5790 posts since 25/5/06

23 Jul 2013 15:33
That's because there's a whole world of people convincing big brands, and very small brands (dentists etc), that they need to be on facebook. They don't, but the powers that be have convinced people that 'new advertising' is about having a 'conversation' with 'real' people.

All. A. Load. Of. Bollocks.

They know it doesn't work as an advertising tool as well, thats why facebook have now started distancing themselves from it.
robii
robii avatar

18857 posts since 8/9/06

23 Jul 2013 15:52
I completely agree. Was just having the same conversation with a mate of mine who runs his own business (as I do). I've got over 5,000 people on my business Facebook page but gave up on it a long time ago as it makes me no money at all. People just waste your time talking the same inane crap they do with their mates, they don't buy anything
deuce
deuce avatar

13705 posts since 21/1/08

23 Jul 2013 15:54
in what way do you think it's a load of bollocks? you'd think if you're an online company, it would only be beneficial to have a facebook page etc?

im not disagreeing with you, just genuinely interested for something im working on
robii
robii avatar

18857 posts since 8/9/06

23 Jul 2013 15:59
In my experience if people want to buy something they use eBay, if they want information, they use Google. In terms of business, what is Facebook for? Who wants to "connect" with some faceless corporation? I can see that lifestyle brands, fashion brands might do well out of Facebook, because people are genuinely interested in talking about that sort of thing, but why the hell does Indesit have a Facebook page? If I'm gonna buy a washing machine, it won't be through Facebook
joe151
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6230 posts since 21/2/07

23 Jul 2013 16:20
but the sheep mentality peeps will think of Indesit when they are browsing washing machines
burny
burny avatar

5790 posts since 25/5/06

23 Jul 2013 16:31
Exactly. Google is yellow pages.

Online advertising has turned out to be far better at fulfilling demand than at creating demand. This accounts for the success of advertising on sites like Google and Craig's List, where people are searching for something.

Interactivity is the enemy of advertising. Whether the interactivity takes the form of clicking a tv remote, pushing a radio push-button, clicking a mouse or swiping a page, people are far more likely to interact with a medium to avoid advertising than to engage with it.

Facebook are essentially using a demand fulfillment business model. That doesn't work, because people don't want to be sold something, they want to discover it. End of the day, not one company has made it big from Facebook. Try name a single company that has made it big advertising on Facebook.

It just doesn't work. Its the wrong business model for advertising. Google works because its in the demand fulfillment model and its offers that service.
robii
robii avatar

18857 posts since 8/9/06

23 Jul 2013 16:51
joe151 wrote: but the sheep mentality peeps will think of Indesit when they are browsing washing machines

Possibly, but how much money does each Facebook sale cost them? I'm certain that those resources (time and money) would be spent better on other forms of advertising.

A lot of people have the mentality that it costs nothing to set up a Facebook page so it can't do any harm, but it takes up a hell of a lot of your time and if you're spending time on Facebook you're spending less time on another aspect of your business. Facebook is a wild goose chase when it comes to sales.
Rez
Rez avatar

7976 posts since 5/4/09

23 Jul 2013 16:52
http://adcontrarian.blogspot.co.uk/?m=1 is a good read for this kind of stuff.
deuce
deuce avatar

13705 posts since 21/1/08

23 Jul 2013 17:16
anyone else know any similar sites/blogs when it comes to online marketing?
nothingelseworked
nothingelseworked avatar

3302 posts since 21/2/10

23 Jul 2013 17:24
Create and nurture brand loyalty? More important to some brands to hold onto customers than get new ones (e.g. Luxury brands).
burny
burny avatar

5790 posts since 25/5/06

23 Jul 2013 18:03
Ok. So you mean if you interact with coca cola, you'll never ever buy a Pepsi again?

Or if you follow your local estate agents, but the house of your dreams is listed with another, you'll not buy it?

joe151
joe151 avatar

6230 posts since 21/2/07

23 Jul 2013 18:28
not loyalty just puts it into your mind a bit, surely people are brand snobs with appliances same as clothes and the imaging around it may appeal to you more/what you remember may tip you over when buying
not saying it's a great way atall
Rez
Rez avatar

7976 posts since 5/4/09

23 Jul 2013 19:10
nothingelseworked
nothingelseworked avatar

3302 posts since 21/2/10

23 Jul 2013 19:16
burny wrote: Ok. So you mean if you interact with coca cola, you'll never ever buy a Pepsi again?

Or if you follow your local estate agents, but the house of your dreams is listed with another, you'll not buy it?

Coca-Cola and Pepsi are luxury brands to you? Interesting.

I'm talking about the likes of Porsche (FYI that's a luxury brand). They won't sell a car through digital marketing, but they sure as hell can create loyalty through their online offerings; creating a follow-up to your purchase, keeping in contact with you, showing you why Porsche is way better than Benz and you made the right decision (Counteracting buyers guilt). I'd love to see you tell someone like Porsche they're wasting their time with Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. These companies aren't fucking thick, they wouldn't pour resources year after year into social if they didn't see any benefit to it.

Read about the purchase funnel and how it has been affected and changed by the emergence of social platforms. And how businesses are injecting themselves into the decision-making.

Edit:

And you can't just use social platforms to post marketing tripe (Or at least not obvious marketing tripe like "Buy this. Buy that."), you've got to post useful or interesting content. Make yourself an authority in your industry, show people you know what you're talking about. If I want to buy some running shoes and have no idea what to buy, I'd go searching through Google for more information on running shoes, right? If a brand (Like Office, for example) decided to write a post on Facebook or their blog with a guide to running shoes and links to the ones they recommend, there's a higher chance I'll buy from Office because they've provided me with lots of information + easy links to make a purchase.
burny
burny avatar

5790 posts since 25/5/06

23 Jul 2013 19:29
All those brands were built very successfully without social media, which was my point. And sorry 'brand loyalty' doesn't exist, because anyone with their own mind will find the shoe they want and then GOOGLE it to find it cheaper. You yourself are guilty of that.
robii
robii avatar

18857 posts since 8/9/06

23 Jul 2013 19:38
nothingelseworked wrote: And you can't just use social platforms to post marketing tripe (Or at least not obvious marketing tripe like "Buy this. Buy that."), you've got to post useful or interesting content. Make yourself an authority in your industry, show people you know what you're talking about. If I want to buy some running shoes and have no idea what to buy, I'd go searching through Google for more information on running shoes, right? If a brand (Like Office, for example) decided to write a post on Facebook or their blog with a guide to running shoes and links to the ones they recommend, there's a higher chance I'll buy from Office because they've provided me with lots of information + easy links to make a purchase.

For the record, I was't using Facebook to spam my products, I was providing advice and offering related products at the same time, but nobody ever wanted to buy anything. Interacting with my "customers" on Facebook was/is like talking to my mates on Facebook. There's no "call to action". People dither, people waste your time, they're not in the mindset to buy, they're on Facebook so their mindset is to make idle chit chat.

I offer exactly the same advice via my own website and it brings in the majority of my sales, so there's nothing wrong with my offer.