General Discussion: I have 15k(ish) to invest - please advise me!


Show original post
swede
swede avatar

7823 posts since 21/3/09

21 Mar 2019 21:32
everything is easy in hindsight eh dee? what about all the shit lancias?

seems like you've cracked it though. wonder why banks/fund managers aren't buying rolexes up by the shitload?
Ronald
Ronald avatar

1384 posts since 9/5/04

posted 21 Mar 2019 22:01, edited 21 Mar 2019 22:01
Watches Are Yet Another Easy Way Rich People Make Their Money Into More Money

Helps if you’re already rich.
classikon
classikon avatar

162 posts since 2/2/14

21 Mar 2019 22:02
Prob goes without saying but before anyone suggests p2p loans now is not the time


Dee
Dee avatar

11092 posts since 22/11/07

posted 21 Mar 2019 22:05, edited 21 Mar 2019 22:05
swede wrote: everything is easy in hindsight eh dee? what about all the shit lancias?

seems like you've cracked it though. wonder why banks/fund managers aren't buying rolexes up by the shitload?

Just poking at opportunities with 5K other than risking some hype trading schemes. Some brighter folk on here will no doubt have better advice.

Razorlight123
Razorlight123 avatar

4363 posts since 13/1/10

21 Mar 2019 22:19
classikon wrote: Prob goes without saying but before anyone suggests p2p loans now is not the time

Was thinking about it months-year back but you're right, can see alot of defaults the way shits going.
joeyjojo
joeyjojo avatar

3911 posts since 24/8/06

21 Mar 2019 23:00
EssexBoyII wrote: Putting your money in an ISA is pointless to be fair. S&S ISA but diversify globally enough to avoid any brexit fall out

Better than not doing anything with it
Bails78
Bails78 avatar

595 posts since 6/1/08

21 Mar 2019 23:15
Does anyone have a spare Freetrade invite they don't mind passing on to a fellow FUK'ER
Ronald
Ronald avatar

1384 posts since 9/5/04

21 Mar 2019 23:23
Horses? You could have turned £5k into £7k betting on Altior at 2/5 during Cheltenham.
DuffMan
DuffMan avatar

14248 posts since 21/2/07

21 Mar 2019 23:31
joeyjojo wrote:
EssexBoyII wrote: Putting your money in an ISA is pointless to be fair. S&S ISA but diversify globally enough to avoid any brexit fall out

Better than not doing anything with it

Not if there's another recession around the corner.

I know very little about watches but looks a bit bubbly given how quickly prices are rising
classikon
classikon avatar

162 posts since 2/2/14

21 Mar 2019 23:37
Put it in one of the Terry Smith funds?

I put 10k in Smithson when it launched late last year, hoping he identifies the next Dominos Pizza Sticking out tongue It's up 14%.

Past performance does not indicate future results etc (also applies to watches)
figurine
figurine avatar

5625 posts since 14/5/07

22 Mar 2019 09:19
Ronald wrote: Horses? You could have turned £5k into £7k betting on Altior at 2/5 during Cheltenham.
Could have made a lot more money if you'd backed £5k on Kazakhstan to beat Scotland 3-0.
swede
swede avatar

7823 posts since 21/3/09

22 Mar 2019 09:53
DuffMan wrote:
joeyjojo wrote:
EssexBoyII wrote: Putting your money in an ISA is pointless to be fair. S&S ISA but diversify globally enough to avoid any brexit fall out

Better than not doing anything with it

Not if there's another recession around the corner.

only really applicable to a s&s ISA, a recession won't affect a normal ISA

i'm with joeyjo. you're an idiot if you think there isn't any point in putting the money in an ISA for safe keeping while you think about what you want to do with it. you'll get a small bit of interest on it and will be able to withdraw it whenever you need it
illwill
illwill avatar

3485 posts since 17/5/04

22 Mar 2019 11:13
Are we talking UK recession or global recession?

If Brexit tanks the pound further, your Sterling ISA savings might be worth fuck all. An internationally diversified s&s ISA wouldn't be so affected.
EssexBoyII
EssexBoyII avatar

6349 posts since 5/6/07

22 Mar 2019 22:19
swede wrote:
DuffMan wrote:
joeyjojo wrote:
EssexBoyII wrote: Putting your money in an ISA is pointless to be fair. S&S ISA but diversify globally enough to avoid any brexit fall out

Better than not doing anything with it

Not if there's another recession around the corner.

only really applicable to a s&s ISA, a recession won't affect a normal ISA

Maybe the stupidest thing I’ve read all day
swede
swede avatar

7823 posts since 21/3/09

posted 22 Mar 2019 22:23, edited 22 Mar 2019 22:23
other than illwill's point regarding purchasing power abroad and a bank actually going bust in a recession (although you are protected up to £80k now) - how will a recession fuck you in an ISA? yes interest rate may fall but you aren't going to actually lose any money are you?
EssexBoyII
EssexBoyII avatar

6349 posts since 5/6/07

23 Mar 2019 23:00
Yes, you obviously can’t ‘lose any money’ but that’s the same as saying you don’t realise massive crypto losses until you sell. The price of food for example cannot lower too much since its largely imported yet the pound weakens. That’s all fine if you can wait it out until there’s a recovery but a prudent person might want to look to make a better return on their money in the event they need liquid funds in the near future. But my point was putting money in a standard ISA was pointless and after inflation, is 1.5% a worthwhile return on investment?
RVP10
RVP10 avatar

169 posts since 3/4/12

24 Mar 2019 11:23
swede wrote: other than illwill's point regarding purchasing power abroad and a bank actually going bust in a recession (although you are protected up to £80k now) - how will a recession fuck you in an ISA? yes interest rate may fall but you aren't going to actually lose any money are you?

The fucking is more the opportunity cost of choosing to hold cash. you can also lose money if the rate of inflation is greater than the interest rate available to you. This is the same reason you should always take interest free credit when available for big purchases: 3k over 2 years is worth less than 3k now.

If you're holding USD denominated stocks in your ISA, when you liquidate the holding it will be converted to GBP at the rate at the time of liquidation (assuming no quanto). This is a way to hedge against a drop in GBP/USD, at the cost of exposing yourself to the rate going up.

If you are holding cash in a low interest savings account, the opportunity cost of that is whatever the rise in your favourite index fund is in that time.

Of course you should choose what to hold based on your appetite for risk; cash is the least risky, then treasury bonds, index funds, individual stocks. I don't know of an ISA that lets you hold derivatives.
Sholto
Sholto avatar

481 posts since 25/12/12

30 Mar 2019 10:16
illwill wrote: Unless you're an absolute expert on the subject, spending your nest egg on watches is completely retarded.

Needs to be said again, utterly daft to invest in a commodity that you don't have expert level experience in. The only thing more retarded than this is probably following an investment tip about a commodity from someone on a forum.

A few questions you should ask yourself if you are thinking of investing:

- What is my investment horizon? - if you're planning on accessing the money within 5 years, then keep it in cash.
- Would I be comfortable seeing a fall in the value of my investment?
- If so, at what point would I start shitting myself? - 10%? 20%? How about 40 or 50%?
- What capacity do I have to take risk - is this money meant for a life changing house purchase, do I have the ability to replace lost capital through future earnings, would my standard of living be effected if the value fell, would I need to draw on the nest egg in tough times?
- Will I be able to sleep at night knowing that my money is invested in X? Do I want to be worrying and looking at my nest egg regularly, or do I want to feel comfortable in forgetting about it for most of the year, knowing that it's doing its thing and working for me in the background?
- Do I understand what I'm investing into?

If you don't want to see any fall in value of your investments, that's fine, but holding cash over the long term still carries a risk of the value being eroded by inflation.

Jake Unkutt
Jake Unkutt avatar

2832 posts since 2/3/04

posted 4 Apr 2019 09:49, edited 4 Apr 2019 09:49
Had about 12.5% return from nutmeg over about 3 years. It did go down for a few months but bounced back up.
I chose a risk rating of 9/10

Pretty straightforward to setup and good if you don't want to get involved with it at all, deposit then forget about it.

Moneyfarm also decent and seems to produce same results, interface isn't quite as good though.


Edit: make that 16% Cool
swede
swede avatar

7823 posts since 21/3/09

4 Apr 2019 10:11
very decent for a hands-off approach that Cool