Menswear: Indie Menswear - Support your locals


Show original post
lee7seven
lee7seven avatar

444 posts since 3/7/01

5 May 2020 07:01
Talking of wealthy parents…

From https://www.couvertureandthegarbstore.com/about : -

"Couverture and the Garbstore was conceived as a creative concept by Emily Dyson-Paley and Ian Paley in 2008."

Joe Bloggs
Joe Bloggs avatar

400 posts since 28/9/10

5 May 2020 07:34
menace wrote:
pentonville wrote:
roophees wrote: Who are godhood backed by?

Think the OP is just someone chatting shit but will wait to be proved wrong..


one of their dad's is a private equity manager or something. Privately backed, not public

Her dad is a property developer, According to companies house he owned a third of the business. Have a feeling their first shop he owned so rent was 0.
Crackajack
Crackajack avatar

7670 posts since 21/4/05

5 May 2020 07:50
Whenever you hear about this sort of success story there always seems to be a weird gap on how they went from University / merchandising assistant / buyer - owning a business with a shop in central London.

If Joe Bloggs post is correct makes that interview a bit galling especially for their competitors without bank of mum & dad.
Joe Bloggs
Joe Bloggs avatar

400 posts since 28/9/10

5 May 2020 07:57
They also had a strong business doing other consultancy I think, they’re both ex graphic designers, used to work with Nike etc.
cutandpaste
cutandpaste avatar

589 posts since 11/6/10

posted 5 May 2020 08:34, edited 5 May 2020 08:34
I think it would be quite difficult to start a retail store in central London without some backing.

You’ll have to have something to put up against the lease, which either means you need a lucrative previous career, investment (family or otherwise), or bank guarantees. The later would need a strong existing business.

Are we no saying we should only support fully bootstrapped businesses? What about brands, how do we feel about investment here?

They are doing alright though tbf, dividends if c£0.4m over 2 years to April 2019.
Hanto
Hanto avatar

2406 posts since 30/11/09

5 May 2020 09:44
Joe Bloggs wrote: They also had a strong business doing other consultancy I think, they’re both ex graphic designers, used to work with Nike etc.

Yeah that sounds right; I have read that before. TBH it's no different than the story with Garbstore. Some of the stores that are successful that are not central London seem to only be because they are not in London, or setup pre booming rental costs. Peggs has been there since early 00s, Nitty Gritty is in one of the more expensive parts of Stockholm but has been there 20 + years, and prior to backing and END. looked like it was in a back street. Look at the location for The Business Fashion for god sake! Laughing out loud

https://www.google.com/maps/place/360+Welford+Rd,+Leicester+LE2+6EJ/@52.610883,-1.1249183,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x487766cd5f437b01:0x95d7ee3bcc8e2d67!8m2!3d52.610883!4d-1.1227296

Mind you it is round the corner from The King Power Stadium so probably makes sense.
Crackajack
Crackajack avatar

7670 posts since 21/4/05

5 May 2020 10:10
Of course they should still be supported, but if people are going to make decisions in part based on ownership/ independance then transparency is important.

You can see how Pentonville came out to bat for them above as an example of how companies like to cultivate an independent vibe as a business tactic.
Joe Bloggs
Joe Bloggs avatar

400 posts since 28/9/10

5 May 2020 10:24
Also a certain point in time it was pretty advantageous being outside of London. A lot of those businesses really saw growth when that started selling sneakers online, and they had access to tier zero and originals because of being the only shop in their remote-ish locations wanting to sell them. (Although it never stopped them all putting them online) If End had opened in London they would not be the shop they are today.
crutch
crutch avatar

465 posts since 22/11/12

5 May 2020 10:30
I guess, for me, the difference is they are still an entity in themselves - not a chain store or owned by some big retail mogul or Mike Ashley type. In an example like Goodhood there always feels a genuine purpose/connection to their customers and brands stocked rather than diversifying some portfolio or capitalising on the growth of the men’s fashion sector.
pentonville
pentonville avatar

843 posts since 12/3/12

5 May 2020 13:07
Crackajack wrote: You can see how Pentonville came out to bat for them above as an example of how companies like to cultivate an independent vibe as a business tactic.

It wasn’t that they give off an independent ‘vibe’, more that the owner unequivocally states that the business is independent and then the passage closes with the writer classing it as an ‘independent’. It’s up to you if it meets your criteria but it is an independent.
swiftus
swiftus avatar

1249 posts since 1/7/09

5 May 2020 13:22
I own a small indie (financed it myself using earnings in previous corporate job). Won't say the name (I've mentioned it before when relevant for fukers discount, it's been mentioned in this thread). Don't know the future tbh given what's happened recently economically. Dealt directly with a few brands mentioned in this thread, as well as some of the agencies (Four Marketing, etc.).

Anyway, I've been thinking about how shops can create more of a connection with their customers. There are the patreon things out there (e.g. Kafka), but is there more possible options than just giving discounts for loyal customers?

What about a concept where your customers can help to shape the store? What if I let the FUK community help decide which new brands to bring in? Or model the clothes? And in exchange, you get a permanent discount, or exclusivity on some of the clothing before it becomes live? The shop wins with a 'truly' loyal customer base, and the customer wins with tangible savings/knowing that they shaped the store.

I guess a lot of it comes down to the level of interaction people want with a store. Is it purely a transactional relationship you want? Do you want to go in (to a store or a site) and be inspired with new brands that you haven't heard before? Or do you just wish there was a store that stocked an obscure Japanese brand that you love?

This was a literal shower thought this morning, but would be great to get people's view. It might just all be bullshit Laughing out loud
bertoni
bertoni avatar

1364 posts since 29/9/11

posted 5 May 2020 13:43, edited 5 May 2020 13:43
I like the idea. I appreciate the attitude of shops like Kafka, Bureau, Clutch but I think it could be taken further. Get Snaye to do the WAYWT and the gear would fly out. A cooperative of sorts would be great. Having input from customers as to which labels to stock etc.

I suggested to VOR shoes recently that they take discounted preorders from customers. I wanted a model during their sale that was out of stock. I knew it would take a while before they could fulfil my order but I was willing to advance the money to help them and get a good deal for myself. That way they get to receive an income during difficult periods like we have at the moment and the customer gets what he wants (eventually) at a discounted price.

For online purchases free returns is a must for me. Costly no doubt but as I had with Converse recently it takes the risk out of purchases.

I think there’s definitely scope for improving shop/ customer relations.
Crackajack
Crackajack avatar

7670 posts since 21/4/05

5 May 2020 14:01
pentonville wrote:
Crackajack wrote: You can see how Pentonville came out to bat for them above as an example of how companies like to cultivate an independent vibe as a business tactic.

It wasn’t that they give off an independent ‘vibe’, more that the owner unequivocally states that the business is independent and then the passage closes with the writer classing it as an ‘independent’. It’s up to you if it meets your criteria but it is an independent.

Yes and the point is retailers make a big deal of cultivating 'indepedent' status to appeal to folks while being quiet on things like significant private investment,family ties, free rent on prime shops etc. Makes the concept of independent a bit pointless really. Good market gimmick tho Cool
pentonville
pentonville avatar

843 posts since 12/3/12

posted 5 May 2020 14:07, edited 5 May 2020 14:07
swiftus wrote: I guess a lot of it comes down to the level of interaction people want with a store. Is it purely a transactional relationship you want? Do you want to go in (to a store or a site) and be inspired with new brands that you haven't heard before? Or do you just wish there was a store that stocked an obscure Japanese brand that you love

Just from personal experience of having two very small businesses, any success has been down to an aspirational factor. I know how cynical this is but it has worked. The co-op style scenario you’ve outlined will work for some but it sounds very lame for a lifestyle brand - more something for a grocery store or vegan cafe.
bertoni
bertoni avatar

1364 posts since 29/9/11

5 May 2020 14:22
Why does it sound lame? Look how many forums exist centred around clothing and style. People have a more emotional connection to clothes etc than they do to vegetables or coffee. It makes sense to look into harnessing and engaging with this connection no?
carl lewis
carl lewis avatar

23958 posts since 14/10/04

5 May 2020 14:28
swiftus wrote: I own a small indie (financed it myself using earnings in previous corporate job). Won't say the name (I've mentioned it before when relevant for fukers discount, it's been mentioned in this thread). Don't know the future tbh given what's happened recently economically. Dealt directly with a few brands mentioned in this thread, as well as some of the agencies (Four Marketing, etc.).

Anyway, I've been thinking about how shops can create more of a connection with their customers. There are the patreon things out there (e.g. Kafka), but is there more possible options than just giving discounts for loyal customers?

What about a concept where your customers can help to shape the store? What if I let the FUK community help decide which new brands to bring in? Or model the clothes? And in exchange, you get a permanent discount, or exclusivity on some of the clothing before it becomes live? The shop wins with a 'truly' loyal customer base, and the customer wins with tangible savings/knowing that they shaped the store.

I guess a lot of it comes down to the level of interaction people want with a store. Is it purely a transactional relationship you want? Do you want to go in (to a store or a site) and be inspired with new brands that you haven't heard before? Or do you just wish there was a store that stocked an obscure Japanese brand that you love?

This was a literal shower thought this morning, but would be great to get people's view. It might just all be bullshit Laughing out loud


Would be nice, but that era has gone now as it's all about the £ now.
cutandpaste
cutandpaste avatar

589 posts since 11/6/10

5 May 2020 15:15
I think the challenge is that for the majority it is purely transactional.

As much a people like the Goodhood styling, they will check if any codes are about elsewhere for the product before buying.

I think it’s more difficult for a curator (retailer) to cultivate a profitable online community, than a creator (manufacturer), as your skill has effectively been circumvented by the above process. I’m sure it’s not impossible though.

Really interesting topic.
pentonville
pentonville avatar

843 posts since 12/3/12

5 May 2020 15:34
cutandpaste wrote: As much a people like the Goodhood styling, they will check if any codes are about elsewhere for the product before buying.

It’s the opposite for me- i just feel like it’s a more worthwhile purchase spending with a business that has invested in its’ image, that’s cultivated something that I would aspire to feel a part of, even if it costs a bit more.probably the minority standpoint and I’m not claiming any sort of superiority for it.
andymakesglasses
andymakesglasses avatar

20440 posts since 26/1/06

5 May 2020 15:42
bertoni wrote: Get Snaye to do the WAYWT and the gear would fly out.

Just as long as he's not involved in the delivery process.
Burt
Burt avatar

6098 posts since 3/1/10

5 May 2020 15:56
andymakesglasses wrote: Just as long as he's not involved in the delivery process.
Laughing out loud