General Discussion: interior design


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pops
pops avatar

4276 posts since 2/9/09

11 Sep 2013 16:08
hdsy- wrote: im gonna buy the muji ash bed too. i tried the pocket sprung mattress and it didn't seem that bad… better than the equivalent from habitat (and £100 cheaper), and only marginally less comfy than more expensive mattresses from warren evans. do you just prefer less firm mattresses, rural?

20% off @ Muji with the Carnaby shopping night tomorrow

http://www.carnaby.co.uk/
Dee
Dee avatar

12052 posts since 22/11/07

11 Sep 2013 18:08
PHiL wrote: Anyone have any experience/knowledge in solid vs engineered wood flooring?

I've been looking at both and dislike a lot of the engineered finishes as they look a bit 'false' although there are a few I could go for.

I've read there a benefits of engineered. I'd be laying it on concreted downstairs and chipboard upstairs.


yep - spent years selling it and went alone fitting it for a while.

There are two types of engineered - engineered solid (one material in lots of layers, cross grained) and engineered floating (normally a layer of good wood, typically on to 2 layers of soft wood, cross grained)

Most of the former are very good, the latter there is good and bad but far easier to fit as you float them like a laminate - Both of our wooden floors at home are like this due to sub floor problems

The other type is Solid (one piece) - parquet, oak planks etc

All can be fitted on to concrete with different types of fixing and prep work.

The benefits of true engineered (made of the same wood in many layers) is that it is the most stable of wooden floors and is suitable for floors below ground level. It's generally not cheap

The benefits of the float solution is that it's normally cheaper, goes over an underlay, not much sub floor prep involved and much easier for DIY, hence the big savings. I can help with a few tips on that if you go that route. Avoid the really cheap & shit floors, you get what you pay for.

The benefits of solid is that it can be sanded down a little more than a true engineered, although it depend on the thickness, not of the floor but of the layer to the t&g. It's a bit of a false thing to go for though as you really don't sand them down unless you are in the property 15, 20 + years and then you may only do it once or twice. you can also get a much better choice of styles etc.







seenmy
seenmy avatar

6662 posts since 17/6/06

11 Sep 2013 19:21
may well go on 13th lanz, nice they having one nearer me so not much excuse to not go
pops
pops avatar

4276 posts since 2/9/09

11 Sep 2013 20:36
its definitely worth a look .Normally some interesting pieces to see in the flesh & a chance to talk to the dealers if you're looking for something specific sourced.

Vitsoe drinks reception tomorrow for the opening of their 620 reading room Smiling

Oh, & popped into Bulthaup today.Left with their B1 catalogue/book. Proper kitchen porn Laughing out loud
seenmy
seenmy avatar

6662 posts since 17/6/06

11 Sep 2013 22:12
looking forward to theday I have a kitchen space that can house that style of kitchen although I would go boffi, I was much more impressed with their showroom than bulthaup, our kitchen rework is taking what seems forever on a greatly simplified project in my eyes, not had a kitchen for 2 weeks, will not for another 2 weeks at least!then we still have the bathroom to tackle before christmas
PHiL
PHiL avatar

8745 posts since 31/8/03

11 Sep 2013 23:18
Dee wrote:
PHiL wrote: Anyone have any experience/knowledge in solid vs engineered wood flooring?

I've been looking at both and dislike a lot of the engineered finishes as they look a bit 'false' although there are a few I could go for.

I've read there a benefits of engineered. I'd be laying it on concreted downstairs and chipboard upstairs.


yep - spent years selling it and went alone fitting it for a while.

There are two types of engineered - engineered solid (one material in lots of layers, cross grained) and engineered floating (normally a layer of good wood, typically on to 2 layers of soft wood, cross grained)

Most of the former are very good, the latter there is good and bad but far easier to fit as you float them like a laminate - Both of our wooden floors at home are like this due to sub floor problems

The other type is Solid (one piece) - parquet, oak planks etc

All can be fitted on to concrete with different types of fixing and prep work.

The benefits of true engineered (made of the same wood in many layers) is that it is the most stable of wooden floors and is suitable for floors below ground level. It's generally not cheap

The benefits of the float solution is that it's normally cheaper, goes over an underlay, not much sub floor prep involved and much easier for DIY, hence the big savings. I can help with a few tips on that if you go that route. Avoid the really cheap & shit floors, you get what you pay for.

The benefits of solid is that it can be sanded down a little more than a true engineered, although it depend on the thickness, not of the floor but of the layer to the t&g. It's a bit of a false thing to go for though as you really don't sand them down unless you are in the property 15, 20 + years and then you may only do it once or twice. you can also get a much better choice of styles etc.

Brilliant thanks Dee Cool I'll probably end up just going with what I like the finish on best.

I was planning on getting Parquet, but I have been talking myself out of it for a few reasons. I've not had the quote back yet mind, so that my make my mind up Laughing out loud
gawkrodger
gawkrodger avatar

7650 posts since 4/11/08

12 Sep 2013 00:09
I think this is the most bourgeois thread on here Laughing out loud
inversesquare
inversesquare avatar

6749 posts since 7/6/08

12 Sep 2013 03:54
Gay aristocrat?
PHiL
PHiL avatar

8745 posts since 31/8/03

12 Sep 2013 10:08
Not quite interior.. but I had just had a quote back off a builder. Im happy enough with it apart from one of the bits. I need the roof of the back bedroom which has a full height pitched ceiling insulated with Kingspan or similar. The room is about 5.5 x 2.5 meters.

Ive been quoted 1400 (matierals and labour).. seems a lot to me, although I must admint I dont know how tricky it is. Anyone had similar done think it's a fair price?
Forper
Forper avatar

2080 posts since 29/1/13

12 Sep 2013 12:12
beedub wrote:
Hanto wrote: Anyone got any idea where I can find Boro fabric cheaply? Considering making a wall feature using a piece at some point but I can only find bits on ebay.

We've just done something similar with some African indigo dyed fabric:


you have way more money than me but your house sucks
shralp-lad
shralp-lad avatar

895 posts since 21/4/11

12 Sep 2013 12:19
loooooooooooooool
beedub
beedub avatar

6810 posts since 7/3/07

12 Sep 2013 12:20
I probably don't but thanks for your constructive criticism. Bear in mind I live with my wife, so her tastes are accounted for too, something I doubt you're yet to experience.
Dee
Dee avatar

12052 posts since 22/11/07

12 Sep 2013 13:13
rural
rural avatar

17817 posts since 26/9/06

12 Sep 2013 14:53
beedub wrote: I probably don't but thanks for your constructive criticism. Bear in mind I live with my wife, so her tastes are accounted for too, something I doubt you're yet to experience.

yet? more like never
diederik
diederik avatar

3306 posts since 16/8/11

12 Sep 2013 15:24
Unless she's made of rubber
selkiefolk
selkiefolk avatar

425 posts since 27/3/13

18 Sep 2013 16:06
I'm buying a few things from the states should anyone be able to help out with shipping, only small art work/prints but the sellers won't mark the items down????

If you don't want to pay the premium price or US duty, here's a workaround. Shutterstock (sure Getty has, too) has loads of those animal/baby animal cut-out/white background portraits. Just search "animal portrait cut out". A few FUKers might have Shutterstock or Getty subscriptions through work. Download the images, send to printers, frame them yourself. Bit more effort but save a few quid.
myyra
myyra avatar

45 posts since 26/10/11

19 Sep 2013 07:53
I've been looking for a nice Paavo Tynell counterweight pendant for six years now, finally found it yesterday. It's this model but with fabric shade and original fabric wiring.
m15try
m15try avatar

1257 posts since 18/8/09

19 Sep 2013 11:40

Possible to get a rug like the above for non-rape?
Forper
Forper avatar

2080 posts since 29/1/13

20 Sep 2013 12:54
Dee wrote:

I miss that room
Dee
Dee avatar

12052 posts since 22/11/07

20 Sep 2013 17:25
Smiling where u living now?