General Discussion: Old UK Garage


Show original post
phikz
phikz avatar

3116 posts since 14/4/09

8 May 2014 17:55
Yeah, although there's a nice little introduction over two pages written by Mike Skinner, and another few pages at the end written by someone else but have forgotten who.
MrW
MrW avatar

2400 posts since 1/8/11

8 May 2014 17:56
Book looks Cool, would love to see roots stuff, Num Nums, Gass, Sun City etc from 94/95

Noble Locks wrote: Free confetti sampler.
http://elusivetracks.com/blog/vinyl-vault-vol1/

Confetti put out some decent tracks back in the day but are straight up cunts nowadays, tried a few times to shut my youtube channel with fake copyright infringements Evil

Spoke to Ray Hurley this morning as well, csb.

phikz
phikz avatar

3116 posts since 14/4/09

8 May 2014 17:59
ShaneB wrote: You'll never get anything like that nowadays - nothing like the garage / jungle / hardcore scene of the 90s early noughties etc. record shop culture is proper dead now.

I wish I was born in the 80's, I've been saying it since forever. There's nothing more I'd have liked to have been about for than the garage scene in its prime, grime too.
SXFuzz
SXFuzz avatar

1739 posts since 22/5/07

8 May 2014 18:02
Noble Locks wrote: Free confetti sampler.
http://elusivetracks.com/blog/vinyl-vault-vol1/
Shame DT's chatting bollocks throughout.

I really wish Confetti would pay a web designer, rather than insist on using a Speak & Spell to code their websites.
ShaneB
ShaneB avatar

908 posts since 28/11/10

8 May 2014 18:03
phikz wrote:
ShaneB wrote: You'll never get anything like that nowadays - nothing like the garage / jungle / hardcore scene of the 90s early noughties etc. record shop culture is proper dead now.

I wish I was born in the 80's, I've been saying it since forever. There's nothing more I'd have liked to have been about for than the garage scene in its prime, grime too.

1990s was the best decade for electronic music - literally every single year had a new & emerging sound - 1990, with early house & techno - 1991-1993 hardcore, then jungle in 1994 & garage if that was your thing, trance in 1998 along with 2-step.

Great time for music with a buzzing record shop culture - massive raves as well in the hardcore years - Dreamscape / Fantazia / Amnesia House, then Helter Skelter for DnB or Sun City for garage. (Always prefered proper house & garage though myself rather than 2-step).

Not sure about 'grime' though - bit too urban / ghetto / moody for my liking. 'Grime' was definitely the last record shop buzz though.
nephew
nephew avatar

91 posts since 23/11/11

8 May 2014 18:07
Cool Thread, I've got a huge garage collection, mostly ripped from vinyl, probably put it up in classifieds if anyones interested in next couple of days
SXFuzz
SXFuzz avatar

1739 posts since 22/5/07

8 May 2014 18:08
MrW wrote: Confetti put out some decent tracks back in the day but are straight up cunts nowadays, tried a few times to shut my youtube channel with fake copyright infringements Evil
I did wonder why a load of their tunes had disappeared from YouTube. I remember when Confetti took Warner to court, so could've been you next.

MrW wrote: Spoke to Ray Hurley this morning as well, csb.
Top bloke.
SXFuzz
SXFuzz avatar

1739 posts since 22/5/07

8 May 2014 18:30
phikz wrote:
ShaneB wrote: You'll never get anything like that nowadays - nothing like the garage / jungle / hardcore scene of the 90s early noughties etc. record shop culture is proper dead now.
I wish I was born in the 80's, I've been saying it since forever. There's nothing more I'd have liked to have been about for than the garage scene in its prime, grime too.
Exactly, my entire teen life was spent listening to underground music and I've long accepted that I'll never have the same passion towards any other music scene for the rest of my life.

I've still got 2,500 garage vinyl at my parents' that I've vowed never to sell.
ShaneB
ShaneB avatar

908 posts since 28/11/10

8 May 2014 18:33
SXFuzz wrote:
phikz wrote:
ShaneB wrote: You'll never get anything like that nowadays - nothing like the garage / jungle / hardcore scene of the 90s early noughties etc. record shop culture is proper dead now.
I wish I was born in the 80's, I've been saying it since forever. There's nothing more I'd have liked to have been about for than the garage scene in its prime, grime too.
Exactly, my entire teen life was spent listening to underground music and I've long accepted that I'll never have the same passion towards any other music scene for the rest of my life.

I've still got 2,500 garage vinyl at my parents' that I've vowed never to sell.

I was always more into hardcore than garage - sold my record collection years ago though. Oldskool hardcore is proper dead though - nobody listens to that anymore; shame really that record shops / rave culture is dead.
phikz
phikz avatar

3116 posts since 14/4/09

8 May 2014 18:57
I caught the back-end of grime though, was a bit young to properly appreciate it as a culture at first but went through a phase of being intensely in to it, but more so with trying to find all the old shit that I heard as a yout but never understood kind of thing. Even catching grime at the back-end I still miss those days when I was proper passionate about it, was just obsessed with all the older shit, few of my friends were as into it as me just chasing old pirate radio shit we'd not heard before. But how shit that is though really compared to actually being immersed in it at the time. Posted on here about it before how there ain't no such thing as proper music culture no more it seems, suppose that's just how it is now everything is so accessible.

But yeah never sell them. I've got a shit load of my mom's old reggae records from when she was younger, a lot of them covered in tags and people's names and stuff from how she said people would write their name on their records from when taking them to house parties and shit like that. Proper jealous that it isn't like that any more, and wasn't for my generation either. Think it definitely makes it seem that much better to me as well as it's just pure nostalgia. I know quite a few people who do buy records now though, and I do myself from time to time but it's just not the same. More of a conscious response in acknowledging the death of the culture. Obviously once upon a time buying records was completely normal and they were actually used and enjoyed. It's more of a statement now when people buy vinyl.
ShaneB
ShaneB avatar

908 posts since 28/11/10

8 May 2014 19:03
phikz wrote: I caught the back-end of grime though, was a bit young to properly appreciate it as a culture at first but went through a phase of being intensely in to it, but more so with trying to find all the old shit that I heard as a yout but never understood kind of thing. Even catching grime at the back-end I still miss those days when I was proper passionate about it, was just obsessed with all the older shit, few of my friends were as into it as me just chasing old pirate radio shit we'd not heard before. But how shit that is though really compared to actually being immersed in it at the time. Posted on here about it before how there ain't no such thing as proper music culture no more it seems, suppose that's just how it is now everything is so accessible.

But yeah never sell them. I've got a shit load of my mom's old reggae records from when she was younger, a lot of them covered in tags and people's names and stuff from how she said people would write their name on their records from when taking them to house parties and shit like that. Proper jealous that it isn't like that any more, and wasn't for my generation either. Think it definitely makes it seem that much better to me as well as it's just pure nostalgia. I know quite a few people who do buy records now though, and I do myself from time to time but it's just not the same. More of a conscious response in acknowledging the death of the culture. Obviously once upon a time buying records was completely normal and they were actually used and enjoyed. It's more of a statement now when people buy vinyl.

Yep - you need a record shop / dubplate culture to get that underground music buzz. Completely dead now with the advent of MP3 / internet etc. It's just a dead technology (monologue).

Shame really - you can't imagine how many record shops there used to be in the heyday of the early-mid 90s - so many of them it's ridiculous - proper random places as well, like Daddy's Armhouse in St. Albans, owned by Gavin Cheung (Nookie - hardcore & DnB).
jaydeesafe
jaydeesafe avatar

687 posts since 16/3/12

8 May 2014 19:17
not completely dead tho.
rural
rural avatar

17443 posts since 26/9/06

14 May 2014 21:54
SXFuzz
SXFuzz avatar

1739 posts since 22/5/07

posted 15 May 2014 00:05, edited 15 May 2014 00:05
Weird how things come back around. I recognised the image used in that YouTube video (I scanned it), so I looked it up on Discogs which is where that user has taken it from and it turns out someone paid £100 for a copy in 2012! Cheers rural, may have to flog my spares.

*edit - bollocks, scratch that, just read the comments and they reissued it this year Sad
ShaneB
ShaneB avatar

908 posts since 28/11/10

15 May 2014 09:38
This was always a tune -



Proper summer anthem.
MrW
MrW avatar

2400 posts since 1/8/11

15 May 2014 11:13
NigelBenn
NigelBenn avatar

3987 posts since 6/2/08

15 May 2014 14:05
We actually need a fuk garage night, who's in?
MrW
MrW avatar

2400 posts since 1/8/11

15 May 2014 21:13
I'd be up for playing a couple of tracks.
ShaneB
ShaneB avatar

908 posts since 28/11/10

21 May 2014 17:49
Anyone like the new garage sound? Alex Agore is quality:

carl lewis
carl lewis avatar

23402 posts since 14/10/04

21 Jun 2014 06:48
Mc Sparks gone