General Discussion: Property thread


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illwill
illwill avatar

3595 posts since 17/5/04

posted 21 Jul 2019 19:30, edited 21 Jul 2019 19:30
I remember reading a comment somewhere that Ikea kitchens were actually pretty decent.

Edit: Found it.

Having worked in the kitchen manufacturering industry for 10 years or so, I can say that on the whole the big players in market source the majority of kitchen frontals from a small number of big suppliers in NE Italy. So on the whole, whether you buy from Wren, Howdens, Ikea, B&Q, Magnet, whoever the performance is about the same. However, each of these companies do their own independent testing. I know for a fact IKEA is one of the best, the suppliers I worked with told me how much of a ball ache they are to get product passed QA and the processes and standards they have in place are second to none at the price point that target, primarily the lower to mid end.
toocan
toocan avatar

711 posts since 7/11/07

21 Jul 2019 20:49
This is on point from illwill

The only thing to add though is there is no space behind the cabinets in Ikea stuff compared to others so fitters fucking hate them if your pipes etc. aint buried. So be wary it might add an extra cost to deal with that. So ask first.

What I researched is Wickes/Howdens/Magnet trade (usually around the back from the main showroom - don't go in the showroom!) all similarly priced are the value sweet spot (the Uniqlo of kitchens) but I went Ikea as pipes were buried

hope this helps
andymakesglasses
andymakesglasses avatar

20182 posts since 26/1/06

22 Jul 2019 08:26
Howdens are good if you have a trade account or your kitchen fitter passes it on at cost, otherwise they can be ludicrously-priced.

We looked at Wren and Ikea kitchens before we went with Howdens.

Wren were more or less comparable to Howdens in quality and had a price-match offer but they weren't comparing like for like (they were comparing the features of their top of the range units with bottom of the range rivals) but more expensive.

Ikea seemed decent but I felt that Howdens was just a little bit better quality.
illwill
illwill avatar

3595 posts since 17/5/04

22 Jul 2019 08:51
There's also a number of firms that do their own fronts for IKEA cabinets.

Gives you a few more options.
swede
swede avatar

7932 posts since 21/3/09

22 Jul 2019 11:17
how closely does a developer have to stick to planning applications? we are owed a drop curb and cycle store according to the approved planning application. developer is dragging his heels about it
andymakesglasses
andymakesglasses avatar

20182 posts since 26/1/06

22 Jul 2019 11:44
Presumably since you're already living there (no stalker) a completion certificate has been issued by the planning authority (not sure if these are called the same in England). If that's the case then you don't really have a bargaining chip regarding the developer.

If a certain amount of cycle storage was a condition of the original application then the developer would need to provide this to comply. But again if the certificate has been issued then the planning authority must have ignored the requirement.

The dropped kerb was presumably included in the planning application, and as such is part of your contract with the developer. Legally you're not supposed to drive over a pavement so are technically breaking the law if there is no dropped kerb (it isn't as simple as just dropping the kerb, permission is also required from the local authority for crossing the pavement so it needs to be done properly).
toiler
toiler avatar

83 posts since 4/5/09

22 Jul 2019 11:50
Thanks for kitchen advice everyone!
swede
swede avatar

7932 posts since 21/3/09

23 Jul 2019 08:20
cheers Andy. I'll probably just take it up with the council tbh…
FrIEND
FrIEND avatar

13430 posts since 27/11/03

23 Jul 2019 22:34
The other reason people go howdens….and it’s why we switched to them. If your order gets screwed up or you need any items added or swapped…Howdens will typically have it in stock…so saves time and paying out for multiple fitter visits.

It’s worth looking at what people say about their order as well as just the quality/finish once it’s all in. A decent carpenter can make anything look good if what they are working with is easy and gives them options.

P.s don’t get your white goods from them. Charge way too much
andymakesglasses
andymakesglasses avatar

20182 posts since 26/1/06

24 Jul 2019 08:36
Yeah, I meant to say that, don't buy any "extras" from Howdens. Buy your sink, taps, etc from another supplier. Also their cupboard carousels are ridiculously expensive, but you can buy aftermarket ones to fit into their units.
stoney
stoney avatar

17376 posts since 22/1/05

2 Aug 2019 18:06
Banks and building societies are cunts. To move house with the same lender they want £800 valuation fee and a £500 admin fee to port the mortgage. If I wasn’t tied in in a fixed I could walk and get it for nothing with another lender.
sydneyking
sydneyking avatar

4533 posts since 26/9/09

2 Aug 2019 18:13
Can anyone advise on plantation shutter materials? Had a few quotes and they vary wildly in price seemingly due to materials yet all look pretty much the same. Is it worth paying more for better quality materials when the aesthetic between them and lesser quality materials is negligible.
themistake
themistake avatar

10517 posts since 20/2/06

2 Aug 2019 21:50
The cheapest is MDF, which is basically wood shavings glued together, so any sign of water/condensation and your shutters will expand. Considering there are 30 odd moving parts to one shutter, you don't want this.

The materials basically go up in price from there, variations of waterproofed/coated hard wood.
Then you get to woods which will look good without any paint/stain like mahogany/oak.

Your shutter salesman should point out which material/colour you should use in each room.
Rirawin
Rirawin avatar

9231 posts since 17/7/05

5 Aug 2019 12:16
Currently have two fireplaces in a Victorian property. One fireplace in the dining room that's been blocked off and the chimney breast runs through to the spare room upstairs to the roof. The other fireplace is in the lounge, nicely closed off but open in a way that we could, if we wanted to put a log burner in, and the chimney breast for that runs through to the master bedroom upstairs, and joins with the other in the roof.

We'd like to remove both fireplaces to make the rooms they're in less awkward. We have the space, but by removing them it just makes the positioning of the furniture more flexible. Especially when it comes to the spare room and loft conversion we plan to do early next year.

However, we've been advised by a couple of people (one an estate agent) that we should keep the fireplace in the lounge as it's desirable thing to have when it comes to reselling in the future.

Do buyers really care about log/multi-fuel burners in Victorian properties? Especially in say 10 years time, which is when we plan to probably sell and move on.
illwill
illwill avatar

3595 posts since 17/5/04

5 Aug 2019 12:46
It's definitely the kind of thing that basic bitches like my girlfriend get excited about.
andymakesglasses
andymakesglasses avatar

20182 posts since 26/1/06

posted 5 Aug 2019 14:39, edited 5 Aug 2019 14:39
I wouldn't have any hesitation in removing the one in the dining room.

For the lounge one it really depends on what it looks like now and what would be lost if you installed your log burner (post some photos if you want a specific opinion). Some people "expect" a fireplace in a Victorian property's lounge, however I don't know how much that would actually affect any future sale price. If someone really wanted one they could reinstall one (although it's a lot of effort and cost).

People like Will's soon-to-be-ex-girlfriend like the idea of a wood fire more than a log burner so long as they have someone to feed and clean the fire for them.

Depending on what's currently there could you keep the surround AND install your log burner?

Any changes like this you make now will likely have a limited effect in the long-run as the value of your property is more dependent on the rise (and fall, thanks Boris) of the market than relatively small design decisions. As long as you're not doing anything that will significantly impact the value of your property (eg reducing the number of bedrooms) you should be fine.

edit: Just re-read your post, is your preferred option to remove the fireplace in the lounge and not install a log burner? In that case people do seem to like the focal point (other than the TV) of a fireplace / log burner and perhaps also the extra heat source.
swede
swede avatar

7932 posts since 21/3/09

5 Aug 2019 16:02
in a post-brexit life it might be decent to have somewhere to burn wood tbf. how else will you keep warm?
illwill
illwill avatar

3595 posts since 17/5/04

5 Aug 2019 16:16
Fire kicks and spicy shirts is all we need.
seenmy
seenmy avatar

6527 posts since 17/6/06

5 Aug 2019 19:29
Rirawin wrote: Currently have two fireplaces in a Victorian property. One fireplace in the dining room that's been blocked off and the chimney breast runs through to the spare room upstairs to the roof. The other fireplace is in the lounge, nicely closed off but open in a way that we could, if we wanted to put a log burner in, and the chimney breast for that runs through to the master bedroom upstairs, and joins with the other in the roof.

We'd like to remove both fireplaces to make the rooms they're in less awkward. We have the space, but by removing them it just makes the positioning of the furniture more flexible. Especially when it comes to the spare room and loft conversion we plan to do early next year.

However, we've been advised by a couple of people (one an estate agent) that we should keep the fireplace in the lounge as it's desirable thing to have when it comes to reselling in the future.

Do buyers really care about log/multi-fuel burners in Victorian properties? Especially in say 10 years time, which is when we plan to probably sell and move on.

we did this in ours and i think in a small victorian terrace it makes a big and valuable difference to the rooms, though I will advise that its a fucking big and messy job, so do not discount how much mess it will make, you also need to get a party wall agreement with neighbours etc and there are quite specific requirements for how the chimney is propped up in the loft, basically its not a small job
sydneyking
sydneyking avatar

4533 posts since 26/9/09

posted 5 Aug 2019 19:29, edited 5 Aug 2019 19:29
@rira are you talking about removing the chimney breast as not sure how removing a fire surround impacts on a loft conversion? for me a Victorian property without the original features would certainly be less desirable. I guess it depends on the fireplace in question as to the cost of reinstalling like for like in the future. Personally I’d keep them as I like the juxtaposition between old and new