General Discussion: Property thread


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noface
noface avatar

115 posts since 23/9/09

5 Aug 2019 22:40
I had same dilemma re fireplace in new property, a few people said it adds value to keep original feature (1930s) but I wanted it removing. It obviously depends on the individual fireplace, but mine was damaged/faded and just not compatible with my furniture. Ended up getting it tiled over and new wood fire surround added, removing it completely would have been well expensive.
stoney
stoney avatar

17418 posts since 22/1/05

6 Aug 2019 08:48
Any architects on here ? Looking for some advice of a loft conversion design.
Rirawin
Rirawin avatar

9242 posts since 17/7/05

posted 6 Aug 2019 21:05, edited 6 Aug 2019 21:05
Thanks all for the advice. Here are photos of the chimney breasts in question:

Dining room


that leads up to spare room


Lounge


that leads up to master bedroom


Having been to the property again today we're pretty keen on getting the dining room one of them removed. Arranged for a structural engineer to come over to take a look, especially in regards to how to future proof if we get a loft conversion. Would be keen to utilise as much space as possible in conversion itself as we've seen some properties where the chimney runs up through it and takes up unnecessary space.
bill
bill avatar

4906 posts since 5/8/09

6 Aug 2019 22:11
I've removed at least 7 chimney breasts over the years. If you worried about space in the loft when why not remove the entire chimney and patch up the roof? You'll not need a structural engineer if you do this but i guess it depends if they chimney backs onto a neighbours chimney.

As said, it's a massive dirty mess of a job, hard to think of a messier job tbh. I'd personally only do it if I was doing major renovations.
sydneyking
sydneyking avatar

4586 posts since 26/9/09

6 Aug 2019 23:33
From your initial post I thought you were talking about original fireplaces rather than just the chimney breast.
Dee
Dee avatar

11234 posts since 22/11/07

7 Aug 2019 04:31
Wont log burners and wood burning fires inside your own home be banned in 10 years time?
andymakesglasses
andymakesglasses avatar

20230 posts since 26/1/06

7 Aug 2019 08:46
sydneyking wrote: From your initial post I thought you were talking about original fireplaces rather than just the chimney breast.

Likewise. I think it'd be a massive ballache to remove the chimney breasts for not a huge amount of benefit. Just whack some built-in shelving into the niches.
Rirawin
Rirawin avatar

9242 posts since 17/7/05

posted 8 Aug 2019 20:27, edited 8 Aug 2019 20:27
My mistake Sticking out tongue

Main aim is to get a loft conversion to add a third bedroom and ensuite, as we believe that would add more value than having a chimney breast in situ for a potential multi-fuel burner. The net does appear to be closing in on home fuel burners, but I have read in the latest update from May this year that there are only plans to enforce sales of the "cleanest" burners and fuels available. No word of a blanket ban by 2030.

After taking Bill's comment and reading this https://www.allaboutlofts.com/single-post/removal-chimney-breast-loft-conversion we're learning towards having the whole chimney and chimney breasts removed. It should mean less complications for the loft conversion when it comes to steel supports, etc. Fortunately, the chimney isn't shared with the neighbours so one less issue to worry about. However, we still need to draw up a party wall agreement and hope they agree to it, if not it's going to cost a few extra quid to get a surveyor in to sort out Cry

If we leave them and get the loft conversion done, they'd both be redundant. While they'd only take up a little of the room space it would still have the awkwardness there.

We'd also prefer to spend the money and time now to go through the whole mess as we haven't moved in yet. Than regret not doing it further down the line when we have all furniture and walls painted etc.

Still, have the structural engineer over on Monday to get his opinion.
sydneyking
sydneyking avatar

4586 posts since 26/9/09

8 Aug 2019 21:36
andymakesglasses wrote: Likewise. I think it'd be a massive ballache to remove the chimney breasts for not a huge amount of benefit. Just whack some built-in shelving into the niches.

The alcoves lend themselves brilliantly to vitsoe.
Crackajack
Crackajack avatar

7198 posts since 21/4/05

8 Aug 2019 21:39
Why does every 'NEWLY REFURBISHED' / spiv flipped property seem to have that shiny grey carpet Laughing out loud

Double SS
Double SS avatar

118 posts since 10/5/07

9 Aug 2019 09:26
Has anyone used Habito as a mortgage advisor? Had an offer pretty much accepted and I am a first time buyer so I have had no previous experience of mortgages
swede
swede avatar

8129 posts since 21/3/09

9 Aug 2019 09:42
Crackajack wrote: Why does every 'NEWLY REFURBISHED' / spiv flipped property seem to have that shiny grey carpet Laughing out loud

fucking horrible isnt it. in the midst of replacing ours
MrW
MrW avatar

2559 posts since 1/8/11

9 Aug 2019 10:44
Double SS wrote: Has anyone used Habito as a mortgage advisor? Had an offer pretty much accepted and I am a first time buyer so I have had no previous experience of mortgages

You've offered on somewhere, had it accepted, and haven't sorted mortgage yet?
Crackajack
Crackajack avatar

7198 posts since 21/4/05

9 Aug 2019 11:06
Lol

IMO it's worth paying £200 or so to use a broker via a local estate agent as 1st time buyer. Your mainly paying for them to chase things on your behalf, speak to vendors agents or potentially access specialist deals that aren't online.
illwill
illwill avatar

3725 posts since 17/5/04

9 Aug 2019 11:28
Lots of brokers work for free and get paid from the lender.

Couldn't recommend ours more and must have done hours and hours of work for us before we eventually decided not to go ahead Oops

PM for deets if you're in the Thames Valley area.
stoney
stoney avatar

17418 posts since 22/1/05

9 Aug 2019 11:39
swede wrote:
Crackajack wrote: Why does every 'NEWLY REFURBISHED' / spiv flipped property seem to have that shiny grey carpet Laughing out loud

fucking horrible isnt it. in the midst of replacing ours

It’s because that’s what most buyers want (that’s why we stuck the same stuff in and it deffo helped)

It wouldn’t however be what I would choose if I wasn’t in the business of flipping Sticking out tongue
sydneyking
sydneyking avatar

4586 posts since 26/9/09

9 Aug 2019 12:08
What’s the benefit of using a broker? Never used a broker. Pay less than 1.5% interest and have done most things mortgage related without any hassle
illwill
illwill avatar

3725 posts since 17/5/04

9 Aug 2019 12:16
Takes out a lot of the legwork if you're in any way non-standard. E.g. Self employed.

Quite useful if you're a noob too.
nothingelseworked
nothingelseworked avatar

3309 posts since 21/2/10

9 Aug 2019 14:43
sydneyking wrote: What’s the benefit of using a broker? Never used a broker. Pay less than 1.5% interest and have done most things mortgage related without any hassle

Further to this:
- Should you always pick a broker that is local?
- What are the merits one might judge a broker on? Is it even possible before you start working with them?
- Best to go with someone that doesn't charge an upfront fee?
sydneyking
sydneyking avatar

4586 posts since 26/9/09

10 Aug 2019 09:54
Any roofers on here? It looks like a need a lead valley replacing and was wondering what sort of ball park cost I’d be looking at?