General Discussion: Property thread


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Goldie
Goldie avatar

4840 posts since 17/10/07

10 Dec 2020 09:19
I'm a plumber.

@sydney that's not good to hear, but sadly not uncommon from what I hear. Seem to be less and less trades taking pride in what they do and it ultimately ends in a race to the bottom. We've become very selective over which builders we work with due to being asked to prioritise profit over quality.
eazypz
eazypz avatar

3619 posts since 16/4/10

10 Dec 2020 09:46
As above, as a sparks I only work with one builder now.
When a client says they want work done but will bring in their own builder, I turn down the job and tell them to use that builders electricians as well.
MrW
MrW avatar

3126 posts since 1/8/11

posted 10 Dec 2020 20:53, edited 10 Dec 2020 20:53
Put down deposit on our work today. New kitchen, losing internal walls, loads of concealed steels and glass across the back of the house. Likely to kick off around March, new boiler and all new rads fitted in Feb with pipes moved from floor to wall, then all new floor throughout downstairs once the kitchen and building work's done. Dreading it tbh Cry Laughing out loud
eazypz
eazypz avatar

3619 posts since 16/4/10

10 Dec 2020 23:52
Best advice I’d say is move out for a bit if it’s within your means.
stoney
stoney avatar

17815 posts since 22/1/05

11 Dec 2020 08:45
You could air bnb it for a bit so your not tied into an expensive regular let. Did that between house moves and worked well
MrW
MrW avatar

3126 posts since 1/8/11

11 Dec 2020 09:23
Thanks for the tip, already looking to move in with parents for a few months while the bulk of the work's done, provided they're jabbed up by then.
YLAup
YLAup avatar

5901 posts since 5/9/11

13 Dec 2020 20:32
Anyone ever asked for a rent reduction? Lived in my apartment since 2013, bar 2 years, so have a good grasp on its value in comparison to other properties in my building and in Manchester.

It's quite obvious now that the rental market is on a downwards trend here. This apartment was historically one of the cheapest in the postcode (due in part to a few quirks), but now many are either the same price or cheaper. Every place on Rightmove has a reduced sign on it.
Kadafi39
Kadafi39 avatar

2147 posts since 30/10/09

14 Dec 2020 10:42
No, but I have been asked for a reduction in rent. Presumably you have an AST in place with your landlord? If you are mid term he will most likely remind you that you have an contract in place with a specified rent.

If you are holding over or your AST is to expire soon and you mention other similar local properties are cheaper and you may move unless they rent is reviewed, you have a better chance of getting a reduction.
1234589
1234589 avatar

974 posts since 1/6/10

14 Dec 2020 14:18
Managed to negotiate almost £150 off a month with our landlord at the end of last year when it came to renewing our contract, for similar reasons in that we'd seen flats like ours for quite a bit cheaper nearby (NE London).

The flat was also managed by a management company who were complete shit at getting anything sorted quickly, so we asked for the reduction at the same time as asking if he'd ditch the management company. He agreed, we wrote up an agreement for dealing with repairs between us, and so far seems to be working well as we no longer have to go through someone else for any problems.
darko
darko avatar

1077 posts since 4/10/12

posted 15 Dec 2020 17:55, edited 15 Dec 2020 17:55
Anyone on here live in any older properties? We’re buying our first house and had offer accepted on a cottage, think it’s probably from the early 1800s.

Recently found out from the solicitor it’s partially made from ‘clay lump’ which I’d never heard of. A heritage construction method (only found in Norfolk but similar to cob) which falls into a ‘non traditional building method’ and will affect the building insurance but hopefully not much else. Hoping the mortgage lender doesn’t shit it when they find out.

Looking forward to ghost hunting in the attic
illwill
illwill avatar

4165 posts since 17/5/04

15 Dec 2020 18:50
Just make sure you get a surveyor that specialises in that material.
stoney
stoney avatar

17815 posts since 22/1/05

15 Dec 2020 18:59
Cobs can get very wet and also susceptible to cracking

https://www.completebuilders.org/specialist-services/typical-problems/
darko
darko avatar

1077 posts since 4/10/12

posted 15 Dec 2020 19:42, edited 15 Dec 2020 19:42
stoney wrote: Cobs can get very wet and also susceptible to cracking

https://www.completebuilders.org/specialist-services/typical-problems/

Cheers mate. It looked in fairly good nick when we viewed it so fingers crossed. Didn’t realise as the outer has been rendered with what I assume is lime render and painted.

RICS homebuyer survey is next week I think, now wondering whether we should have plumped for the all singing all dancing £800 one. We’ll see.
stoney
stoney avatar

17815 posts since 22/1/05

15 Dec 2020 19:44
I’d go for the full survey. I do the homebuyers and they are pretty lightweight. When your making a big investment especially on a cob, I’d say go for the full one. Feel free to pm me if you want.
Crackajack
Crackajack avatar

8155 posts since 21/4/05

15 Dec 2020 19:47
Agree with getting the full survey. Things can get worse from survey date to getting the keys (damp etc), need as much as you can go on when it becomes your problem + the potential to use it to negotiate price down it could pay for itself a few times over.
stoney
stoney avatar

17815 posts since 22/1/05

15 Dec 2020 19:47
As a caveat though, cob isn’t something that’s prevalent in my area, but it’s something I know of.
darko
darko avatar

1077 posts since 4/10/12

15 Dec 2020 20:02
Thank you chaps, have PM’d you Stoney.

The old woman who owns the house said she’s had no issues with damp or the roof and she’s been there 14 years, but then I suppose she would say that.
Hanto
Hanto avatar

3469 posts since 30/11/09

16 Dec 2020 08:35
My parents house, which I lived in until I was about 25, was half victorian, half mid 17th century. My room was in the older bit, but my dad had renovated old buildings before so was happy with the challenge. Just be wary of windows leaking heat and possibly uneven floors! Laughing out loud

The other thing to bear in mind is that there may be elements, if made in a specific way, that need to be done in the same way when repairing, if it's listed or has any preservation ruling on it, which can be more expensive to maintain. Not likely you'll need it, but…
MrW
MrW avatar

3126 posts since 1/8/11

16 Dec 2020 09:15
While not listed in this case, was reading elsewhere the other day about someone whose annual house insurance renewal for their grade 1 listed building was just under £4.5k. The building itself wasn't hugely expensive but what pushed up the price was the rebuild value, due to additional costs and complications of reinstating a protected property which could be three or four times that of a standard property.

Appreciate it's not listed in this case, but would definitely check insurance costs as well any caveats insurer may stipulate. Also agree with above comments - well worth paying the extra ££ upfront for a full survey.
Kadafi39
Kadafi39 avatar

2147 posts since 30/10/09

16 Dec 2020 10:17
As mrW says definitely get quotes for buildings insurance before you exchange so you know what to expect.

I would also bear in mind that the normal survey or the full survey will only address things that are accessible and visible. If its covered behind lime render or not possible to gain access from inside the house etc then they wont address it.