Random Questions: read this if you wear glasses or lenses


denisovich
denisovich avatar

996 posts since 14/6/05

10 Dec 2009 15:00
Not posted here for years.

Anyway, thought I’d share something with you. To anyone who needs glasses or lenses, but does not particularly enjoy wearing them and does not want or cannot afford laser surgery.. Ask your optician about ortho-k lenses. They work best if you are somewhere in between +3 and -6

Basically it’s an overnight lense which you put in just before you go to sleep and take out when you wake up. you don’t feel it in your eye when you’re asleep – so no discomfort issues and your eye is closed all night – so no dryness etc. you wake up in the morning and you can have 20/20, all day (and night).

Massive plus on holiday too – no hassles with lenses on the beach or swimming etc.

Anyway, this is a pretty random post, but they are the best thing I’ve ever encountered and no one I’ve ever met has ever heard of them.

Cost wise – same as normal soft lenses but a damn sight more convenient.
DuffMan
DuffMan avatar

14389 posts since 21/2/07

10 Dec 2009 15:26
for reals?
research time
Noble Locks
Noble Locks avatar

66963 posts since 10/7/03

10 Dec 2009 15:35
sounds bloody good for vain binnsys everywhere if its true.
Protege Moi
Protege Moi avatar

5460 posts since 15/11/02

10 Dec 2009 15:39
Isn't general advice to remove contact lenses before bed. With rapid eye movement when asleep, lens can move to places you don't want them to be?
Jesus
Jesus avatar

6088 posts since 7/10/08

10 Dec 2009 15:39
do you own the company?
Jesus
Jesus avatar

6088 posts since 7/10/08

10 Dec 2009 15:42
Protege Moi wrote: Isn't general advice to remove contact lenses before bed. With rapid eye movement when asleep, lens can move to places you don't want them to be?

its awful when you skull fuck someone to have to pull a contact lense out your foreskin as well
Dreep
Dreep avatar

1741 posts since 29/7/08

10 Dec 2009 15:43
Protege Moi wrote: Isn't general advice to remove contact lenses before bed. With rapid eye movement when asleep, lens can move to places you don't want them to be?
They tell you this but I've been keeping my lenses in for about 3-6 months a time without problem.
denisovich
denisovich avatar

996 posts since 14/6/05

10 Dec 2009 15:46
general advice for soft lenses is defo not to sleep in them. these are rigid gas permeable - they allow oxygen in and they don't move -they're not meant to be worn other than when you're asleep.

don't own the company - just a vain bins wearer.

these aren't new, they've been around a while.
Zeke
Zeke avatar

1799 posts since 13/7/06

10 Dec 2009 15:48
About £400 a pair ain't they, last a year? Heard good things about them, but never used them meself
denisovich
denisovich avatar

996 posts since 14/6/05

10 Dec 2009 15:49
Dreep wrote:
Protege Moi wrote: Isn't general advice to remove contact lenses before bed. With rapid eye movement when asleep, lens can move to places you don't want them to be?
They tell you this but I've been keeping my lenses in for about 3-6 months a time without problem.

big mistake - the problem doesn't happen that rapidly. you'll just gradually look like the blood vessels in your eye are taking over your whole eyeball. not a good look.
Dreep
Dreep avatar

1741 posts since 29/7/08

10 Dec 2009 15:49
denisovich wrote:
Dreep wrote:
Protege Moi wrote: Isn't general advice to remove contact lenses before bed. With rapid eye movement when asleep, lens can move to places you don't want them to be?
They tell you this but I've been keeping my lenses in for about 3-6 months a time without problem.

big mistake - the problem doesn't happen that rapidly. you'll just gradually look like the blood vessels in your eye are taking over your whole eyeball. not a good look.
Been 5 years, eyes look fine.
andymakesglasses
andymakesglasses avatar

20641 posts since 26/1/06

10 Dec 2009 15:52
It's an incredibly bad idea to keep your lenses in that long Dreep, you're risking pretty severe eye health problems in the future.

This is what denisovich is talking about http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthokeratology
Trumps
Trumps avatar

641 posts since 7/9/09

10 Dec 2009 16:12
Be fucking great to go swimming and not worrying about loosing yo lenses and still be able to scope the women on the beach/poolside
FLG
FLG avatar

5890 posts since 21/5/04

10 Dec 2009 16:37
Dreep wrote:
denisovich wrote:
Dreep wrote:
Protege Moi wrote: Isn't general advice to remove contact lenses before bed. With rapid eye movement when asleep, lens can move to places you don't want them to be?
They tell you this but I've been keeping my lenses in for about 3-6 months a time without problem.

big mistake - the problem doesn't happen that rapidly. you'll just gradually look like the blood vessels in your eye are taking over your whole eyeball. not a good look.
Been 5 years, eyes look fine.
Jawdropping!
InWonderland
InWonderland avatar

2662 posts since 8/2/07

10 Dec 2009 16:45
These would help with Astigmatism too, right?
andymakesglasses
andymakesglasses avatar

20641 posts since 26/1/06

10 Dec 2009 16:53
I didn't know about this until denisovich's post, so I'm obviously no expert Laughing out loud however, with a severe astigmatism it can stop people wearing soft lenses, so hard lenses are prescribed instead.

So one would imagine that this kind of treatment is suitable for astigmatism sufferers, yes.
Trumps
Trumps avatar

641 posts since 7/9/09

10 Dec 2009 17:03
andymakesglasses wrote: I didn't know about this until denisovich's post, so I'm obviously no expert Laughing out loud however, with a severe astigmatism it can stop people wearing soft lenses, so hard lenses are prescribed instead.

So one would imagine that this kind of treatment is suitable for astigmatism sufferers, yes.
I read it was OK for astigmatism up to -1.5. I'm going to have to check my prescription to see if I fall within that. I use soft torics at the moment.
andymakesglasses
andymakesglasses avatar

20641 posts since 26/1/06

10 Dec 2009 17:07
Oh yeah, it says that in the link I posted Oops

Wikipedia wrote: In the United Kingdom the procedure is offered primarily for myopic correction up to -5.00 dioptres and up to -1.50 dioptres of astigmatism. Fitting evidence for the leading lens designs indicates that procedures undertaken within these parameters have the highest probability of success. However, not every patient within these parameters will be suitable for the procedure and, for example, conditions such as flat or steep corneas may result in the procedure being less successful. Some patients with higher degrees of myopia are successfully treated by specialist practitioners with "off-label" uses of these same lenses.
denisovich
denisovich avatar

996 posts since 14/6/05

10 Dec 2009 17:10
another major plus is that it stops further deterioration. not a major factor for me, but say you're -3 now, it would be good to have something that holds you there so you don't end up a -5 two years later..
DuffMan
DuffMan avatar

14389 posts since 21/2/07

10 Dec 2009 17:14
I might have to look into this, my eyes are slowly degrading. Although they may have stopped.